T.S.R – RC

TOTAL SHOULDER REPLACEMENT- ROTATOR CUFF INTACT

 

Purpose

To replace the damaged articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid with prosthetic implants to relieve pain and repair the rotator cuff to restore or improve range of movement and function.
Indications

All patients with pain from arthritis of the glenohumeral joint and a rottor cuff that is intact.

 

Implants

Two implants are used; a humeral component, composed of a modular metal shaft with separate head components and a glenoid component made of polyethylene with or without a metal surface.
Skin Incision

A Deltopectoral approach is most commonly used.

 

Possible Associated Procedures

  • Acromioplasty and sub acromial decompression if sub acromial impingement co-exists
  • Excision Hemiarthroplasty of the ACJ (Acromioclavicular joint) if the joint is arthritic and symptomatic.

Main Possible Complications

  • Infection
  • Damage to nerve and blood vessels
  • Humeral shaft or glenoid fracture
  • Dissociation of implant components
  • Arm vein thrombosis
  • New shoulder joint stiffness

After your operation

-The arm will be rested in a controlled position in a sling or brace. The physiotherapist and nursing staff will show you how to adjust and safely remove and re-apply this.
(link to living with a sling)
-An x ray will be taken the day after surgery.
-You will be able to return home when your pain is well controlled and you can cope with your arm in a sling, typically 2 days after surgery.
-You can expect to need painkillers for 2 or 3 weeks after surgery to control the background pain. You will also need to take painkillers an hour before each exercise /physiotherapy session ; ideally 3 times a day, for up to 8 weeks or even longer.
-You will be shown specific shoulder and arm exercises by your physiotherapist before you leave the hospital. These exercises are very important and must be carried out accurately after leaving the hospital on a daily basis at home; ideally 3 times a day, for at least 8 weeks. To achieve optimal results, daily exercices should continue for up to a year.
-The stitches must be removed or the wound inspected ( if absorbable sutures are used) at 14 days after surgery: either by your GP’s practice nurse or at the hospital.
-Your surgeon will typically need to see you 4 weeks after surgery.

TOTAL SHOULDER REPLACEMENT WITH ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

Purpose

To replace the damaged articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid with prosthetic implants to relieve pain and repair the rotator cuff to restore or improve range of movement and function.
Indications

Patients with pain from arthrosis or degenerative changes of the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint with an additional, repairable Rotator Cuff tear.

Implants

Two implants are used; a humeral component, composed of a modular metal shaft with separate head components and a glenoid component made of polyethylene with or without a metal surface.

Skin Incision

A superior ( Mc Kenzie) approach is most commonly used.

DIAG here

Possible Associated Procedures

  • Acromioplasty and sub acromial decompression if sub acromial impingement co-exists
  • Excision Hemiarthroplasty of the ACJ (Acromioclavicular joint) if the joint is arthritic and symptomatic.

Main Possible Complications

  • Infection
  • Damage to nerve and blood vessels
  • Humeral shaft or glenoid fracture
  • Dissociation of implant components
  • Arm vein thrombosis
  • New shoulder joint stiffness
  • Failure of Rotator Cuff

 

After your operation

-The arm will be rested in a controlled position in a brace.The physiotherapist and nursing staff will show you how to adjust and safely remove this (link to living with a sling)
-An x ray will be taken the day after surgery.
-You will be able to return home when when your pain is well controlled and you can cope with your arm in the sling. This is typically 2 days after surgery.
-You can expect to need painkillers for 2 to 3 weeks after surgery to control any background pain. You will also need to take painkillers an hour before each exercise / physiotherapy session. You will need to do exercises for at least 8 weeks after surgery.
-You will be shown specific shoulder and arm exercises by your physiotherapist before you leave the hospital. These exercises are evry important and must be carried out accurately after leaving hospital on a daily basis at home: ideally 3 times a day, for at least 3 month. To achieve optimal results, daily exercices should continue for up to a year.
-The stitches must be removed or the wound inspected ( if absorbable sutures are used) at 14 days after surgery: either by your GP’s practice nurse or at the hospital.
-Your surgeon will typically need to see you 4 weeks after surgery.